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20130326
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-- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are weighing right now are do we need better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at the gay marriage issue, that is very generational
that was open to conservative views, particularly on foreign policy and some domestic issues. it was much more electric than at this time is now. now it is another liberal magazine. >> i want to show you an ad that was in the publication in 2007. well let's see if you remember this ad. on the screen, all aboard, enjoy seven days and night on the aalso can coast with your favorite weekly standard pundits, june 16-23, 200. special private programs and receptions. on and on. like-mind conservatives. what was the impact of that cruise on american politics? >> sure. well i think the discovery of sarah palin was one thing. on the cruise, we went up there in southern -- we were not up around anchorage in that part of alaska, but we were mr. we went to juno and so on. in juno, we were invited by the governor to have lunch at her house in the governor's mansion. he found out later this came about because the woman who was the head of the alaska federation of republican women or whatever the title is and had told the governor's space that we were coming and, at first, she was ignored. she told them agai
that in that foreign policy matters, colin powell will be my chief adviser. i would think that would be a smart move. this is a decent fella who served this country well, and i think that would be, i mean if you are asking do i think he would be a great secretary of state? you bet. >> mr. barnes? >> that was good question. that was one of the better once i asked. >> what would you say today about colin powell? >> oh, well, who? george bush. >> yeah. >> he would probably say the same thing. certainly there is a rift between them over foreign policy and it opened up while powell was still his secretary of state. >> twitter. fred barnes is on twitter. why? >> my son has convinced me that i have to be on twitter. don't tweet much. but i tweet occasionally. i tweet maybe once a week, ebbs sent for my son nicely will tweet my articles. he sends those out. >> what does he do? >> my son worked for kevin mccarthy, the republican whip in the house of representatives and was, until recently, a floor assistant, the job he loved. >> all right. twitter. i will read some of the twitter messages that you sent out.
in november 2014. between now and then is a crucial time for the internet and u.s. foreign policy. that will happen between now and november 2014 that will shape the outcome. they will elect a new secretary- general. every right in the constitution , the country has been pushing for literally international regulation, like the internet. overhave been very patient the years. it sounds like black helicopter conspiracies, but it is not. i'm not optimistic. .he state department has a role we are all unified. congress is unified. we had a rare moment last year where the house and senate resolutions passed with both chambers and really underscoring our view of internet freedom. why is that view important to the developing world? most heartbreaking here. there are a lot of developing world nations that are signing onto this treaty that will undermine the economic future and the personal future. it might be because some regimes are more authoritarian. it right lock some of their freedom. that is what is motivating a lot of them. >> to block traffic, if i understand correctly. >> there is
spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcome to the washington journal. the federal reserve chairman holds his news conference with .eporters u.s. aid officials testify on syria. the commerce panel hears from ,he faa about sequestration and a hearing on domestic use of drones. all those events and more on c- span.org. 10 years ago today marks the us- led invasion into iraq. that is where we begin this morning to get your take on the 10th anniversary. here are the numbers -- host: send us a tweet or post your comments on facebook. we will get to your phone calls in just a minute. is the us from baghdad pentagon correspondent for the washington post. begin with your headline this morning. at least 60 are killed in iraq on tuesday. what happened, and is this a pattern? guest: it has been the deadliest day since u.s. troops have pulled out. an al qaeda group took responsibility for this wave of bombings, and said it was doing so to seek revenge from the government. hearing si
started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thought that asia des
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
is for a generation republicans dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. and on foreign policy, they did not support the bush foreign policy, so the issues that made that republican party dominant, all three issues are in democratic favor. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter what network you have. economic conservatives and smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better databases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you look at t
and trade agreements with india and japan and the united states are part of the foreign policy and building those competitive -- in the world. and we can provide the economy with the infrastructure that it needs. investment largest in railways cents victorian times and spending more onerous than in a generation. and the treasury is now writing guarantees for major projects from the old power station site to build a new power station of tomorrow. we switched billions of pounds from current capital spending, to mitigate the sharp decline set in by the last government. stillpital spending is due to fall back in 2015-2016 and i don't think that this is sensible, and by using the extra savings, we will list the infrastructure by 3 billion --nds per year, with filth 15 billion of extra capital spending over the next decade, to invest in the economic arteries of this country to get growth slowing to every part of this. deputy speaker, public investment will now be higher on average as a percentage of the national income under our plan that was in the last labor government. out long- will set term
at this podium and talk about foreign policy issues but i'm glad to be here today to talk about this diplomatic campaign in pakistan and afghanistan. i want to say one of the good things about speaking to a washington audience, when jessica goes through the jobs you've had everyone goes uh-huh, uh-huh. >> i was somewhere speaking and someone said here is ambassador grossman. i want to say what a pleasure it is to see so many people here in the audience who i have had the great benefit of learning from for many years. without drawing any distinctions i hope you'll allow me three. i started my career in pakistan junior to 1979 as a officer and howy was a boss of mine. i see ambassador hugh sane as the first a foreign diplomat i ever had to meet and do business with. i'm glad to see you. simon henderson was a stringer for a number of very important pub bli indications then and he taught me a lot of about journalism. i know there are others this in this room as well. those three take me back to 1979.1978 and we'll see what you say when this is over. what i want to do stod take up the offer that i
dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. they didreign policy, not support the bush foreign policy, so the stoll that made that republican party dominant come all three issues are in democratic favre. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter until network -- it does not matter what network you have. conservatives and, smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you l
. when dick and i started the center back in 1983, it was our first dedicated foreign policy center at the heritage foundation. back then asian security was all about what's happening here in the cold war. from that perspective, study of the soviet union might have made a lot more sense. dick and i, as we talked it through, talked about the potential that someday it might even be conceivable that u.s. trade with asia would actually even equal our trade with what was going on across the atlantic. today, it's much greater than our trade across the atlantic. we have been blessed by the insights of many dear friends in asia. we have over the years seen the remarkable economic growth and economic development in asia. it's been our very great pleasure, in fact, to recognize that in terms of economic freedom, as it has evolved throughout asia in specific countries and indeed throughout the region. we always knew that our good friends in japan and that the u.s.-japan mutual relationship, both the mutual defense treaty and our bilateral general relationship would be central. but we also thou
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
direction, that the appeal of a nonintervention in foreign- policy is really picking up's read. rand paul stop by national review and he is a charismatic figure. that matters in politics. we saw his speech here and elsewhere that this is a guy who resonates on the floor and i think he has a bright future in republican politics. >> did john mccain revised his remark? i did not know that. >> he apologized. >> good for him. he was jealous that someone could stand up for 12 hours without urinating. >> rand paul had help with other folks. i agree with the fact that we ought to be putting pressure on the justice department and the administration to come forward with a lot of clearances. what was your take on it? >> given the situation he's in, many conservatives -- his father could walk into a room and rand is the opposite. rand looks for ways to diffuse the situation. people who have served in politics understand how important that is. i had the privilege of going with rand paul and his wife and two of his sons to israel right outside of jordan in january. what i saw was amazing politician. a
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
is the foreign policy if not the military role of your brand in china in areas like socom. have you noticed that unity, not military, diplomatic, economic activity that both these countries quick >> the short answer is absolutely. to put a little meat on a bone, one of the things i'm supposed to be doing is making sure the united states rants apart archers of latin america. the partnership is a too late thing i you'd agree that it's very one-way now and they very much want the united states in their lives the exception of the two or three or four of them very much want the united states and allies. so we have great trading relationships, great military to military contact, but when you have an organization like the chinese come in the economically powerful, spending money, whether they're increasing infrastructure that pours, panama canal are buying everything that they want and large, large quantities. the partnership with china is very strong. they do the best they can to establish milk to build partnerships and they do pretty well on that. so that's china. on the arabian side, we've seen
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and tweets. "washington journal" every morning live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> said they hired a very expensive carriage. elizabeth monroe dressed herself in her best and went to the prison where she was being held. she met with madame lafayette and basically made her case public one. some stories say, the next day, she was released. it was not the next day. it was a couple of months. it's pretty much kept her from going to the guillotine. >> in some ways, she has her own cause. she works with the washington aquino orphan asylum. in some sense, that is somewhat more and -- modern. she does work politics in her parlor. >> our conversation with historians on elizabeth monroe catherine adams. it is now available on our web site. >> other generations are asking, how do we adapt? how do we move in this fast- paced world? millennial are taking it in stride because that is the reality of how we grew up. it has brought a sense of ease and adaptability. it has brought us the ability to be resilient to the economic cr
at eastern on c-span and c-span3, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, the house foreign committee affairs allied u.s. policy toward the asia pacific region and of relations with china. he talks about north korea's's nuclear program, trade agreements, and india's role in the region. from the heritage foundation, this is about one hour. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. days, thext 13 president of the heritage foundation. i am delighted to have with us as amorning my successor new president, senator jim demint. we're happy you are here to join us. to theme all of you auditorium. it's good to see so many friends here and particularly a happy occasion for us to be able to co-host the reception afterward with the ambassador of the the republic of korea. it's very special time for korea to celebrate the first anniversary of chorus and we celebrate and commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the korean war. today, we have a number of other significant guests who are here with us representing the samsung company from their new jersey headquarters, mr. m.j. han and welcome you here on
right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physi
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)